What a grand time spring is! Pea plot planting, bee box building and peach tree pruning are the every-day-type activities around the Staddon’s place. Though it was kinda cold this year for the month of March, one couldn’t help but observe Michael’s honey bees working—as busy as bees I assume?—on the few days that happened to be warm. So with Mom’s amazing crocus’ in bloom, I spent a bit of time outside to see what I could find.

Prepare for Landing

031613-JAS_6328

Wow! Honey bees sure don’t know how to pose! I guess they just don’t have time to learn. I tried a lot of different things and waited and waited in the most awkward positions but, alas nothing ever came of it. As for this shot, I don’t think I actually remember setting anything up for it. It was one of those serendipitous accidents when I saw a bee buzzing around this flower and (out of excitement for the fact that there was actually a bee visible and not completely buried inside the flower) I just let the camera go like a machine gun in hopes that something would turn out, remembering to keep the AI Servo autofocus on the flower for when the bee might enter the same plane of focus. I don’t bank much on the “blast method” of taking pictures, but if you are willing to wade through oodles of pictures for that one shot that only seldom actually exists, than I deem it worth while.

By the way, you do have to watch out for what I like to call “tacky sharp” images: those shots that are just not exactly perfectly focused but are close enough where hefty sharpening makes them work. If you zoom up real close, you will see that this is one of those kind of shots. It will never really look good in print, but on screen, it’s acceptable to most audiences. But why should I mention it? It certainly doesn’t help my promotion of the blast method….

Receive blog updates in your inbox!

Subscribe

Send the next blog post straight to your email inbox!

Thank you for subscribing!

Pin It on Pinterest