Editing scanned artwork

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  • #54065
    Lydia Bennett
    Keymaster

    Hey all! My cousin enjoys watercolor painting, and was asking me about editing programs for the her scanned artwork. She would mostly just need to use it for adjusting colors.

    She said as far as she understands, usually when you scan a watercolor it changes the color of the painting to less vibrant colors, so people use photo editing software to correct the colors. The end goal is for her to be able to make prints of things she paints.

    She uses a Mac, and I suggested she check around on there to see if there’s already some sort of program that would work for what she needs, but also told her I’d ask around. I don’t know much about Macs or editing scanned images, so if anyone has a word of advice to offer, I’ll pass it on to her.

    Thanks!

    #54074
    Erin Phillips
    Participant

    Hi Lydia!

    I’ve never scanned artwork before, but I have scanned images (and edited them) and GIMP has worked well for me in the past. My siblings all use Mac and there is a photo editing program on there (not sure what it’s called) that seems to work well. Scanning does make the colors less vibrant, but I think some saturation could help with that. Also, your cousin may want to read the printer’s manual (if she hasn’t already), since they might have suggestions or different settings that would work for higher quality scanning.

    Hope this helps!
    -Erin

    #54076
    Ezra Morley
    Moderator

    GIMP would definitely work, but it’s a rather clunky solution if all you need is a simple contrast/saturation adjustment. 🙂

    Her Mac would come with the Photos app, which has some basic editing tools… See this article for details, and this video for a quick tutorial.

    #54077
    Ezra Morley
    Moderator

    Good idea, @ephillips about reading the printer manual. 🙂 I would suggest scanning to PNG or TIFF format instead of JPG because (at least on Windows) the default JPG scans are heavily compressed, which definitely decreases the image quality.

    (It’s OK to save the scans as a JPG after editing though, if she wants to share them online.)

    #54193
    Lydia Bennett
    Keymaster

    Fantastic! Thanks for that info, Ezra and Erin!

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)

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