FEATURED: An Animal that Flies

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This topic contains 50 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  Esther M. 3 days, 1 hour ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 51 total)
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  • #43572

    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    This is great guys, keep it comin’!

    @rhodabarrick, do you have Paint? If you do…. https://www.lenspiration.com/video/downsizeusingpaint/

    #43698

    Rhoda Barrick
    Participant

    Great! Thanks, James! Very helpful!

    #43699

    Sonja Grace
    Participant

    I was searching for birds to photograph in my backyard when I stopped at some wild Rocky Mountain bee plants. I knew hummingbirds loved these flowers. I put my camera onto a burst shooting mode with a fast shutter speed and continuous auto-focus. Then I waited. I had seen this hummingbird at the flowers earlier, and I really wanted to get some nice photos of it. The hummingbird came several times but kept going into the thicker areas where the flowers grew. It was really tough to get a photo with a clean background. After a long time, the hummingbird visited a flower right in front of me that was separate from the rest. I took as many photos as I could before it flew away. I was extremely thankful when I saw that all the photos I had taken of it where perfectly in focus. I am blessed to have 4 different types of hummingbirds that visit my backyard in the summer: Broad-tailed, Black-chinned, Rufous, and Calliope hummingbirds. The male hummingbirds of each species are easy to tell apart by thier brightly colored gorget (the name for a hummingbirds throat patch). However, the female hummingbirds are much more difficult to tell apart, so I am not 100% sure what type of hummingbird this is.

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    #43728

    Rhoda Barrick
    Participant

    Some friends of ours own a rental home in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. They frequently make trips up there to make sure everything at the house is in order, It was on one of these trips that my sister and I joined them. On the last day that we were on the Cape, my sister and I walked to the Santuit River. There, we found the river abounding with beautiful swans! We spent the next hour or two watching them and taking pictures of them as they peacefully swam around on the river!

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    #43742

    Sonja Grace
    Participant

    I love birds! My love for bird photography started with photographing birds in my backyard for identification purposes. This love increased dramatically when I was given a nice camera for my 15th birthday. I was fascinated with the challenge of digitally capturing God’s beautiful creation, and I started learning as much as I could about photography. I didn’t realize at the time that birds are one of the most difficult subjects to photograph. On a chilly April morning, I was at Barr Lake State Park near Denver, Colorado photographing birds. My time at the lake was rewarded with capturing good images of Bald Eagles, Canada Geese, a Ring-necked Pheasant, House Finches, woodpeckers and several types of ducks. I had been outside for about 4 hours and was ready to head home. As I was walking to the car, I heard some killdeer in a field. I had been wanting some good killdeer photos, so I decided to stay a little longer. I slowly crept into the muddy field trying not to get muddy and being extremely careful not to scare the birds. There were 5 of them and it looked like they were getting ready for nesting season. I got down to the birds’ eye level and started photographing them. They didn’t seem to notice that I was in the field and sometimes came uncharacteristically close to me. I noticed that the birds were fighting with each other, so I put my camera onto a burst shooting mode and a faster shutter speed to try to freeze the action. The fight continued for a while, but the most surprising moment was when all 5 killdeer lined up perfectly and looked at me. The moment only lasted half a second before the birds were back fighting. I could not believe what had just happened and I quickly searched through all the photos I had taken to see if I had been able to capture the moment. I was absolutely thrilled when I saw this photo! I doubt I will ever capture such a perfect moment again!

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    #43746

    Sonja Grace
    Participant

    The sun was shining brightly. That was disappointing. Photographing in harsh sunlight was not my first choice, but I decided to take on the challenge. I was searching for a killdeer. Killdeer are common near water, but they can also be found in fields and in dry areas even though they are shorebirds. While quietly making my way through a field near a lake where I had seen some killdeer earlier in the year, I was delighted when I heard a nearby bird call out, “kill-deer!” These birds are named after the sound of their call. I quietly got down and laid on my stomach in the field so I could photograph the killdeer at eye-level. I was really excited when the killdeer ran across the field and came really close to where I was hiding. There were some small purple wildflowers in the field that added an extra element of beauty to the photos. I spent almost an hour watching and photographing this killdeer. Despite the harsh light I was able to get some beautiful shots of it.

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    #43753

    A&E Mullet
    Participant

    Wonders in the Weed Patch

    Out behind our barn is a small area of our driveway where an old lawn tractor sits in the weeds next to some neglected fencing and some leftovers from the wood chip pile. Wandering over this direction around midday, camera in hand, I was looking to photograph one of the big gray grasshoppers that often sit on the driveway. However, buzzing around some pink flowers in this weedy area of the gravel, a hornet caught my eye. After shooting a few pictures at rather close range (you must be willing to get close when your lens only zooms to 55mm), I began to notice more amazing little flying machines. Grasshoppers and other small insects began to catch my eye, now that I thought to look for them. I found that God’s small creatures are a lot of fun to see through a camera’s lens. If you want to see wild, incredibly designed, and spectacular nature, you don’t have to go far. Just go out to the grass in your backyard, and let the sight of God’s creatures awe your heart to worship our incredible Maker!

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    #43759

    A&E Mullet
    Participant

    The Butterfly Is Out!

    It was a lovely, sunny, summer morning when I heard excited calls from the front porch. A quick investigation revealed that one of our butterflies had found its way out of the confines of its cocoon.
    It has become a summer tradition to raise a few caterpillars, watching them eat and grow fat, turn into a cocoon, and climaxing in watching a butterfly strengthen its wings and fly away.
    This summer was no exception, and now, after weeks of feeding caterpillars and waiting for cocoons to open, we had a beautiful, Black Swallowtail butterfly on our front porch!
    Grabbing the camera, I hurried to the scene. After a few attempts, I found that it was going to be a challenge to get a good photo. The small number that I did take were simply boring, showing a gorgeous butterfly on a drab brown porch.
    The butterfly was crawling around, but not using its wings. Then, to our horror, it fell off the rail, a drop of twelve and-a-half feet! About three feet before it would have hit the ground, the butterfly caught an oregano plant. As it held there, seemingly unharmed, we breathed a sigh of relief.
    Looking at the butterfly, I realized that it was now in a much better position for a good picture. I hurried down and found that the marigolds behind it became an amazing background, beautifully accenting the butterfly’s colors.
    An hour or so later, one of my brothers reported having seen a Black Swallowtail flying around. A quick check revealed that “our” butterfly was gone! We had once more witnessed the miracle of an ugly caterpillar become a gorgeous butterfly.

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    #43761

    A&E Mullet
    Participant

    Eastern Tailed-Blue

    I love watching butterflies flutter and dive around the yard on summer days, but equally enjoyable to me is trying to photograph them.
    This summer I noticed one that I hadn’t seen before. Looking online, I came to the conclusion that this is an Eastern Tailed-Blue butterfly. It has a wing span of less than one inch, and while the males have very blue wings, the female’s wings are a dark gray-blue.
    In order to get this photo, I singled out a female and followed her around. I wanted a close-up of her, but I only had an 18-55mm lens. So, whenever she landed on a clover flower, I slowly eased up on her, trying to get within about two feet and down close to her level. After numerous attempts, I was able to capture this photo of the Eastern Tailed-Blue, wings wide open. So small, and yet so perfect, this tiny butterfly points to its designer and creator, God.

    Caption for the bee photo:
    “Mmm…What a feast!”

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by  A&E Mullet.
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    #43779

    KelseyFHall
    Participant

    A mother starling collects materials to build her nest.

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    #43781

    KelseyFHall
    Participant

    A northern cardinal watches over the forest.

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    #43783

    KelseyFHall
    Participant

    A male ruddy duck taking a quiet swim in the pond.

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    #43792

    Eliana Franzenburg
    Participant

    I have tried to photograph butterflies before but they never turned out that well as butterflies don’t exactly sit around and wait for you to take their photo. I still keep trying every time I see one although I’ve never gotten a good photo till one day.

    I was photographing some lavender that my Grandma grows, there were some bees and butterfly buzzing doing their jobs pollinating and such. I didn’t pay much attention to them as I main interest was the lavender. After some time I noticed that there was one butterfly just siting at my feet completely comfortable with me and my camera. Once I noticed it I thought I’d try to get a good photo. I had to quickly change my settings and frame the photo well and in the end I finally got my butterfly photo.

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    #43794

    Sarah Beers
    Participant

    While walking on a beach boardwalk with my family, camera in hand, I spotted bright yellow Goldenrod flowers near the edge of the boardwalk. Most of the flowers were in full bloom, and some were past their peak. There were many butterflies, bees, and other winged insects enjoying the sweet nectar. One Monarch butterfly really stood out to me. The light from the sun was shining on it from one side, illuminating the colors on its wings.I quickly snapped photos of it and other butterflies that were there. All the beautiful details on the butterfly’s wings show God’s skilled hand, as if He took a tiny paint brush and hand painted each design.

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    #43797

    Sarah Beers
    Participant

    The bird feeders hanging from the big tree in my yard attract many visitors, some more unexpected than others. Ever since I was a little girl, I would watch bright green Monk Parakeets fly around and nest on top of telephone poles, and I would hear them squawk loudly to one another. I always thought it was amazing that there were parakeets- birds I would expect only to be kept as pets or in the jungle- flying around in my neighborhood. One day, a parakeet stopped by the tree in our yard to eat from one of the bird feeders. Soon a couple of its friends joined it, and then some more until there were about ten birds. Some were just resting in the tree, others savoring the bird seed. It was interesting watching them try to eat out of a bird feeder! I wasn’t able to get pictures of them the first time they came around, but I was happy to see them come back again so I could snap photos and just admire them up close. Since that time they have become more regular visitors- much to my delight.

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 51 total)

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