Lake Bellfield, Halls Gap

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Caitlin Compton 3 months ago.

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  • #31310

    Caitlin Compton
    Participant

    Hey! My family and I went fishing the other day at this beautiful lake near by. I decided to take my camera along, and was glad I did – I ended up spending more time taking pictures than fishing! When I was there there it felt almost moody with smoke rising in the distance and the looming mountains framing a valley on either side of the lake. I was determined to capture a masterpiece. But unfortunately, (like so many other times) I really struggled to capture the mood I was going for and a compelling composition. It just didn’t turn out how it felt it looked when I was there. And now that I’m done editing it, it looks more like a sunny, summers day! I was wondering if you had any thoughts on capturing the mood you’re trying too and some more in depth landscape composition tips. I feel like my landscape images often end up flat without the ‘pop’ factor and really don’t do the real scene justice. I’m also interested in your thoughts on the image I’ve submitted – composition, editing etc.

    And of course if anyone else has any critique or thoughts, I’d love to hear them too! 🙂

    The first image is the unedited version. I originally attempted to remove the lens flare in Lightroom with the spot removal tool – bad idea! Then I attempted it with Photoshop using multiple layers and the clone tool. (using this tutorial) I wasn’t entirely happy with the result as I think it looks a bit blurry, but it was a better job than the spot removal tool. Does anyone have any thoughts on lens flare removal?

    Shot in Manual
    Aperture – f/14
    Shutter Speed – 1/50 sec.
    ISO – 100
    Focal Length – 17 mm
    Camera – Canon EOS 60D
    Lens – Tamron 17-50mm F/2.8

    Attachments:
    #31398

    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    I wasn’t exactly sure what to think about these photos when I saw them the first time….an epic place, that’s for sure! But there certainly is a lot of lens flare too!

    Here are my comments on how I would solve that problem, plus my answers to your questions about composition and landscape photography: https://www.lenspiration.com/video/webinar061218/

    I love seeing the new places you visit, photograph, and share here on the forums!

    #31425

    Caitlin Compton
    Participant

    Thanks, @jamesstaddon! Good idea for editing in B&W. I’m going to give a shot. Also, I checked the front of my lens – so dirty! I’ve cleaned it up, so hopefully won’t have so many problems with lens flare now. Thanks for the tips – now I want to get out there and shoot some more landscapes! 🙂

    I wasn’t able to watch it live, but really enjoyed the replay. A huge thank you to Donnie Rosie and you for spending so much of your time critiquing my photos. It was fun hearing your different perspectives/takes and ideas – I learnt a lot!

    #31442

    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    A huge thank you to Donnie Rosie and you for spending so much of your time critiquing my photos

    Our pleasure!

    #31461

    Daniel Hancock
    Participant

    Another option for dealing with lens flare: if you shoot on a tripod, just take one photo as normal, and one with your fingers blocking the sun, and then merge them together. Sometimes, it helps to use the 5 sec timer to prevent camera movement between shots from pressing the shutter button.

    Attachments:
    #31472

    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    Great examples!

    #31578

    Caitlin Compton
    Participant

    Thanks, @dhancock! I’ll have to try that out next time I’m in a situation with bad lens flare. 🙂

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