Smartphone camera vs. DSLR

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Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)
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  • #16543
    Mr. Quebec
    Participant

    I know @Elizabeth-Lindsay‘s father has an app for his iPhone that he uses to get great shots with his iPhone.

    I use Android. 🙂

    Thanks everyone!! I also wondered which would be a better investment price-wise (smartphone vs DSLR)?

    Electronics in general have a very poor resale value. A DSLR body paid a thousand dollars could very well worth a few hundred dollars ten years later. Lenses, however, usually don’t depreciate as fast.
    About smartphones, I can’t tell, I don’t know much about it. I know that it depreciate fast, though.

    B.T.W. What is the P&S market?

    Sorry if I write things not clearly. (I’m a french-speaking person) 😉 What I was trying to say is that point-and-shoots may have a hard time commercially. As @buddingphotographer pointed out, ”bridges” P&S still have a neat advantage over smartphones. However, an ordinary P&S doesn’t have much more to offer than a smartphone camera.

    #16556
    O. S.
    Participant

    Hi @Joesph! If you are looking to take pictures for the point of photography, my suggestion would be go with a DSLR. I have an iPhone 5s and a Canon Rebel T5 and the Rebel can do so much more. That said, if you just want to document moments, a phone would work great.

    #16567
    Elizabeth Lindsay
    Participant

    My dad has an app on his iPhone 5s, called “Camera+”.

    #16568
    Joseph Camuso
    Participant

    Hi @oksch, thanks for your imput.

    I think there must be a way to get a nice blurred background, but I’m not sure 🙂

    On a little tiny-sensored phone camera, the answer is No. At least not without digital manipulation, which would definitely decrease the quality somehow.

    @buddingphotographer, @Mr-Quebec, what do you think about the bokeh in this image?
    Samsung Galaxy S7

    #16569
    Ezra Morley
    Moderator

    Looks pretty good for a tiny sensor! How close was your phone to the subject? And how often will you be shooting at that distance? 🙂 The thing is, with a DSLR you can get bokeh even better than that at much further distances, like for portraits.

    #16570
    Mr. Quebec
    Participant

    I’ll echo @buddingphotographer. Great bokeh for a smartphone camera, but as @buddingphotographer said, DSLRs have more pratical ways of getting such bokehs .
    I’ve heard of tiny lenses that can be mounted on smartphone cameras. Maybe such lenses could do a great job in terms of bokeh?

    How close was your phone to the subject?

    Though I’m on the DSLR side, I’ve remembered a neat point that smartphones have over DSLRs that would be unfair to let out.
    Macro.
    I don’t know about your smartphone, but it’s amazing how much I can bring my smartphone near a subject and still have the subject in focus. I mean really close. I have no lenses that can get that close. I must tell that I don’t have a macro lens, nor extension tubes, but I really doubt that DSLRs could get that close!

    #16571
    Mr. Quebec
    Participant

    Though I’m on the DSLR side, I’ve remembered a neat point that smartphones have over DSLRs that would be unfair to let out.
    Macro.

    Sorry DSLR users. I know it sounds like smartphones would take better macro pictures than DSLRs. DSLRs beat smartphones at macro photography hands down, if equipped for macro. What I was trying to say is that a smartphone will let you focus closer than a DSLR with a non-macro lens.
    For sure, if you don’t mind getting the closer possible and cropping the picture afterwards, DSLRs with non-macro lenses are still probably a better option than smartphones in terms of picture quality, but if you look for a quick and easy macro shot, in my opinion smartphones make a point.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by Mr. Quebec.
    #16576
    Ezra Morley
    Moderator

    I’ve heard of tiny lenses that can be mounted on smartphone cameras. Maybe such lenses could do a great job in terms of bokeh?

    They might make it better, but I sort of doubt that it will make much difference… The sensor has a lot to do with good bokeh; the bigger the sensor, the better the bokeh. Of course, the lens has a lot to do with it too, there are lenses even on a Full Frame DSLR that have “bad” bokeh.

    Though I’m on the DSLR side, I’ve remembered a neat point that smartphones have over DSLRs that would be unfair to let out.
    Macro.
    I don’t know about your smartphone, but it’s amazing how much I can bring my smartphone near a subject and still have the subject in focus. I mean really close. I have no lenses that can get that close. I must tell that I don’t have a macro lens, nor extension tubes, but I really doubt that DSLRs could get that close!

    Yep, that’s one place where P&S and phone cameras have a definite advantage. Actually, their small sensor gives them an advantage in macro, because the DOF is large enough that you actually get better results. You can get more of your close-up photo in focus with a smartphone for the same reason that you don’t get nice bokeh! So I guess you take your pick, nice bokeh, or better close-up capabilities!

    I happen to have a macro lens and extension tubes! With a combination of extension tubes and reversed lenses I can focus as close as I want to! My late snowflake setup focused about 1.75 inches from the subject, and it gave more magnification than 5 smartphones! 🙂

    #16577
    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    I also wondered which would be a better investment price-wise (smartphone vs DSLR)

    When it comes to photography, you’ll most definitely get the most bang for your buck with a DSLR/mirrorless with lenses combination.

    By all means use the camera on the phone that you have. But I would never invest in a smartphone for the purpose of photography.

    #16584
    Joseph Camuso
    Participant

    Hey everyone, Thanks for all the input. Sorry this is a little scattered catching up!

    @buddingphotographer, I think I was about three or four inches away from the object when I took that pic.

    …with a DSLR you can get bokeh even better than that at much further distances, like for portraits.

    @mr-quebec, Yes, that’s totally true! 🙂 Even zooming in with the smartphone only decreases the quality and does not help with bokehs.

    I don’t know about your smartphone, but it’s amazing how much I can bring my smartphone near a subject and still have the subject in focus. I mean really close

    That is definitely one thing that I like about the smartphone I used as well.

    When it comes to photography, you’ll most definitely get the most bang for your buck with a DSLR/mirrorless with lenses combination. By all means use the camera on the phone that you have. But I would never invest in a smartphone for the purpose of photography.

    @jamesstaddon, Thank you! I agree!

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)

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