What size photo should I deliver to my clients?

Home Forums Photography Q&A What size photo should I deliver to my clients?

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  • #51453
    Caitlin Compton
    Participant

    Hi all!

    So, I conducted my first engagement shoot on the weekend. ๐Ÿ™‚ Everything went pretty smoothly (aside from almost ruining my lens! Note to self – never put a lens in your pocket and then bend over taking pictures on the edge of a flowing creek. If your lens falls out your pocket and there doesn’t happen to be a tree branch in the way, you will lose your lens. ๐Ÿ™‚ lol ) Anyway, all that aside, I’m in the process of editing and processing the images now and have a couple of questions!

    What size should I export the photos to give to the couple?
    And, I’m planning to send them a USB with the photos on it. Is this a normal/acceptable way to deliver photos to clients? ๐Ÿ™‚

    Thanks!

    #51468
    Lydia Bennett
    Keymaster

    So glad to hear that the shoot went well, @creative-click-photography! Sounds like quite the scary moment there with your lens though!

    What size should I export the photos to give to the couple?

    I’d suggest you give them full size photos. Currently, when I export my photos in Lightroom to deliver to a client, I do not resize the photos down, I set “quality” to 100, and set the resolution to 300 ppi (in case they want to print the photos). For now at least, I just give them the highest quality possible so they can print or download however they’d like. My client gallery gives them different options for download size, so if they don’t want the full-size photos for some reason, they can download a smaller size if they want.

    And, Iโ€™m planning to send them a USB with the photos on it. Is this a normal/acceptable way to deliver photos to clients?

    From what I know, I think that should be fine. When you set up your website later though, it would be good to have a client gallery where you can send download access to your clients.

    Here are a couple resources on Lenspiration that relate:
    This lesson in the Foundations Course speaks on image size/resolution, and uses giving photos to a client as a sample scenario! It’s good to review.
    – Forum string: Ways to Digitally Share Photos With Clients

    #51482
    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    Congratulations, @creative-click-photography! Praise the Lord about your lens there, too. ๐Ÿคฆโ€โ™‚๏ธ

    I agree with @bennett-family…I deliver the high res, edited JPGs (only, I export at a quality setting of 90, because that decreases the amount of hard drive space it takes up without reducing any visible quality, at least, as far as I can tell).

    And yes! Delivering a thumbdrive is a great way to do it. Some photographers will pre-order a ton of blank thumbdrives that they customize with their logo/name on it, so when they deliver the photos to their clients, their clients know where that thumbdirve came from. ๐Ÿ™‚ It’s helpful to the client since it’s a unique thumbdive (they won’t get mixed up with others), but it’s also helpful to the photographer because it’s like advertising, and the client will be more likely to remember your logo/name.

    #51518
    Eliana Franzenburg
    Participant

    I’ve used a thumbdrive before and it works very nicely! The only downside is you have physically hand it to them (or send it in the mail) and that’s only practical if you live close.

    Since then I’ve started using Dropbox and that is my favorite way to deliver photos to clients. You just upload your photos to a folder then send a link to your clients and they can download the photos without having to create an account or anything.

    #51535
    Lydia Bennett
    Keymaster

    (only, I export at a quality setting of 90, because that decreases the amount of hard drive space it takes up without reducing any visible quality, at least, as far as I can tell).

    That’s good to know. I’m still not always sure I can totally see a difference in the quality settings so I usually would choose 100 to be safe rather than sorry.

    #51536
    Jamie Parfitt
    Participant

    I’m so glad that I came across this forum, because I was just wondering about exporting my photos at a smaller size. I use Pixieset to deliver to my clients, but since I want to continue to use the free plan instead of upgrading to a paid plan with more storage, I thought maybe I should start exporting my clients’ photos smaller so that I don’t run out of space as fast. Are you suggesting that when I export from Lightroom I should decrease the quality or I should “limit file size to ____” some specific size?

    ~Naomi

    #51538
    Lydia Bennett
    Keymaster

    @momparfitt

    I currently use Pixieset as well, and was just realizing the other day I need to look into this myself! Iโ€™m close to running out of space on the free account, and I need to figure out my options going forward! ๐Ÿ™‚

    I definitely like the look of the website you can create on there โ€“ it looks great! I hadnโ€™t put mine together yet (I donโ€™t think they had that feature when I set up my account), but itโ€™s something Iโ€™m starting to think about putting together once I decide what Iโ€™m going to do for my client gallery!

    I only recently noticed that the largest download size they allow your client on the free account is 3600px longest edge. So I think between sizing photos down to that, and setting the quality lower than 100, that could save some space. 3G of space sounds like a lot until you start getting going and actually using it up! Wish I had thought about that a year ago! ๐Ÿ™‚

    #51615
    Caitlin Compton
    Participant

    Thanks everyone for your input! That’s great that exporting is straight forward – I can just do what I normally do. ๐Ÿ˜…

    Some photographers will pre-order a ton of blank thumbdrives that they customize with their logo/name on it, so when they deliver the photos to their clients, their clients know where that thumbdrive came from. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Yes! I was thinking of looking into that. ๐Ÿ™‚

    it would be good to have a client gallery where you can send download access to your clients.

    Yes! I feel like online galleries are the more accepted way to do things these days – is that correct? I’m so glad that you guys brought up Pixieset. I was just considering that and was going to ask if anyone had any experience with it, but it looks like you beat me to it. (BTW, @bennett-family and @momparfitt, you’re portfolios looks amazing!) So, I have a couple of questions in regards to Pixieset – can you do private galleries that the client accesses with a code or something? How does the client download their pictures? I’m presuming that you don’t have to have a buy option – the client can download their pictures for free?

    #51707
    Lydia Bennett
    Keymaster

    I feel like online galleries are the more accepted way to do things these days โ€“ is that correct?

    I don’t entire feel qualified to answer this, so I’ll let @jamesstaddon give a more official answer :), but from my limited experience, I’d say, yes. These days, it just makes things easy for you and easy for your client. Plus, you could theoretically have the option for them to order prints through you if you have an online gallery, whereas thumb drives don’t quite give that option. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Iโ€™m so glad that you guys brought up Pixieset. I was just considering that and was going to ask if anyone had any experience with it

    Well, that’s perfect timing, then! ๐Ÿ™‚ As I mentioned before, the free account only allows storage up to 3G, so you do have to be careful and conscious of that. I’m getting close to my space limit, so I need to decide what to do!

    Other similar websites you could check into:
    Smugmug (I have an acquaintance who uses this site)
    Passgallery.com I know a few photographers who use this site. Passgallery looks like they have some pretty sweet free deals, but as my dad would say, “the big print giveth, and the small print taketh away”…I haven’t done much research into the “small print” of their plans. If their plans are as good as they look, I may just consider switching over once I run out of space if I want to stay with a free option. ๐Ÿ™‚ Haven’t really researched my options yet though.
    Zenfolio

    Let me know if you’d like more info on any of those, or if you have any info on them to offer! I’d be happy to ask photographers I know who use them for their feedback, too.

    And, to answer your questions about Pixieset!

    can you do private galleries that the client accesses with a code or something?

    Yes you can. When you set up a gallery, there are all sorts of privacy options. You can…
    – Toggle on/off “homepage visibility”
    – Choose an “auto-expiry date” which causes the collection to be hidden after that date
    – Select sharing options
    – Generate a “collection password” which requires guests to enter a password to view a collection (I don’t do this. In my opinion, I achieve the same idea by toggling on/off homepage visibility)
    – Give “client exclusive access” which allows you to set up your Collection with additional features for your clients like being able to view Hidden Sets, or mark images as Private. I haven’t used this as of yet.
    – And more.

    Most of the time, I’ll leave homepage visiblity on for portfolio purposes, but do not allow sharing options, that way only my client can really have access to the photos. There’s an auto-generated password I send the client to download their photos.

    Occasionally I’ll toggle off homepage visibility, for various photography projects or things I just don’t care to have in my portfolio.

    How does the client download their pictures?

    You can allow them to download the entire gallery or download individual photos. I usually give them the ability to do either/or. They have to enter the password, and then they can download! You can have advanced options, like restricting the downloads to only email addresses you specify, or limiting the number of total gallery downloads. I don’t do those things. And you can select what resolution they can download, up to 3600px on the free account.

    Iโ€™m presuming that you donโ€™t have to have a buy option โ€“ the client can download their pictures for free?

    Correct. I include the digital photos in my photo session price, so folks download their photos for free. If you wanted, you could set it up that they pay for the digital downloads or order prints through you. On the free account, pixieset would take a commission (15%, from what I see).

    #51713
    Jamie Parfitt
    Participant

    Ditto everything Lydia said! I set up a free account with Pass Gallery before I was told about Pixieset, so if I run out of gallery space in my Pixieset gallery, I always have the option to upload to my Pass Gallery website. But I have not done that, as I like to keep everything in one place! ๐Ÿ™‚

    ~Naomi

    #51719
    Lydia Bennett
    Keymaster

    I set up a free account with Pass Gallery before I was told about Pixieset

    Very interesting!

    Pass Gallery advertises three free options ranging from 1500 photos (5GB of storage) to 6,000 photos (20 GB of storage) which, at a glance, appear to all have the same features. Do you know if it’s really as good as it looks or what the difference is between those three options?

    Was there a reason you opted to go with Pixieset rather than sticking with Pass Gallery?

    #51727
    Jamie Parfitt
    Participant

    Yes, I thought it was funny that they are all free but with different storage limits. I don’t know if Pass Gallery lets you have a personalized website, but I liked that Pixieset does. I think maybe I read an article by someone who gave some reasons why they chose Pixieset over Pass Gallery, but now I don’t know what the reasons were!๐Ÿ˜‚

    ~Naomi

    #51792
    Lydia Bennett
    Keymaster

    I donโ€™t know if Pass Gallery lets you have a personalized website, but I liked that Pixieset does.

    Ah, good point! And I love Pixieset’s personalized websites. They look really professional.

    Those amounts of storage spaces on Pass Gallery just look so tempting, though! And for free… ๐Ÿ™‚

    #51827
    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    Are you suggesting that when I export from Lightroom I should decrease the quality or I should โ€œlimit file size to ____โ€ some specific size?

    Personally, when I deliver photos to a client, I give the full pixel dimensions (so, no Image Sizing at all in LR), but I do set the Quality slider to lower than 100. I can’t see that much of a difference in quality between 100 and 65, and yet, on an experiment I just ran, the difference in size is 10MB vs 1.63MB. No change in pixel dimensions. At Quality 65 it starts becoming every so slightly noticeable, but run your own experiments. If I’m concerned about space, I export at Quality 65. And really, I think 50 is acceptable. I my test, it was 1.12MB at Quality 50.

    I feel like online galleries are the more accepted way to do things these days โ€“ is that correct?

    I’d say galleries feel the most professional. Dropbox links are great, but they don’t give a professional, front-end experience to a client. It feels like a back-end transfer of files. Both work, but if you’re trying to give a professional impression, an online gallery is going to give that. And some people may feel it’s more safe that way too. Another advantage of a gallery is that, if you pay for it, you may get unlimited space (like I do with Zenfolio) and thus the photos can be accessed online by a client forever, and that can be a plus to a client, to make them feel like there’s no way their pictures will ever be lost.

    #51838
    Lydia Bennett
    Keymaster

    I canโ€™t see that much of a difference in quality between 100 and 65, and yet, on an experiment I just ran, the difference in size is 10MB vs 1.63MB.

    I find this very interesting. Sooo, then why export at 90 or 100 if you can save that much space by going with 65 or 70?

    When I’ve tried running experiments myself, it gets a little tricky because I’m not exactly sure what I’m looking for in quality difference, if that makes sense.

    To explain with an example: I know what I’m looking for when I’m trying to see what the difference is between ISO 100 and 400. I know what grain looks like in a photo. So if I wanted to run experiments on quality differences between different ISOs, I could do that. But when I first got going in photography, I couldn’t have done that so well. I didn’t see or identify grain the same way I do now. (And once I learned what grain looked like, it’s been bugging me ever since! :[ ๐Ÿ˜€ )

    So this is why I had started exporting at quality 100 for clients since I do want them to have the highest quality photos possible.

    Hope that question makes sense. If not, well I can try and re-explain ๐Ÿ™‚

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)

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