What's underneath

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This topic contains 13 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Ben Glick 2 weeks, 6 days ago.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #34847

    Ben Glick
    Participant

    I was inspired by a challenge my friend gave to me, it is to take a seemingly non-photogenic photo, using a rock and a background of your choice, it has to be natural and outside.

    This is what I came up with, and I would love to inspire some of you guys with this challenge as it is FAR harder than it seems.

    P.s, if you want to save yourself a lot of hardship, be sure to spend a lot of time post-photo and do a lot of editing.

    Name: IMG_2758.JPG
    Dimensions: 3456 x 2304
    File Size: 4.1MB (4,291,819)
    Date Created: 11/9/18 6:06:26 AM
    Date Modified: 11/9/18 6:06:26 AM
    Camera Make: Canon
    Camera Model: Canon EOS REBEL SL1
    Lens Model: EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
    Lens Specification: 18/1 55/1 0/1 0/1
    F-Stop: F5.6
    Aperture: F5.7
    Focal Length: 55.0 mm
    Shutter Speed: 1/83 s
    Exposure Time: 1/80 s
    Exposure Compensation: 0 EV
    ISO Speed Rating: 200
    Date Time Original: 11/9/18 6:06:26 AM
    Date Time Digitized: 11/9/18 6:06:26 AM
    White Balance: Auto
    Metering Mode: Multi-segment
    Flash: No, compulsory
    Exposure Program: Landscape/manual
    Exposure Mode: Auto
    Color Space: sRGB
    Pixel X Dimension: 3456
    Pixel Y Dimension: 2304
    X Resolution: 72
    Y Resolution: 72
    Resolution Unit: inch

    This is super cool, I just wanted to post what I got from my photo shoot. I think it was a success.

    Attachments:
    #34854

    Josiah Waldner
    Participant

    So you want us to try it too? I might try it tomorrow. Got a few ideas, mostly involving macro-type shots.

    #34859

    Ben Glick
    Participant

    @josiahw Totally! No one has to, but I found it as a cool and trying photo shoot, I would encourage anyone who wants to, to totally try this.

    #34860

    Josiah Waldner
    Participant

    Here’s what I came up with. Both were shot with a 50mm 1.8 lens, tripod, and remote release. I used a 10 stop ND filter to blur the water.

    Attachments:
    #34867

    Ben Glick
    Participant

    Hey man! Wow these are incredible and I can’t believe your stuff turned out so well! I am super impressed, well done! Great stuff, two ideas on photo #1.

    The first is that you have a rock that you have out of focus in the bottom of the camera to add contrast against the background and the rock, good idea, bad approach. Your rock is taking up almost “half” of your photo! And its not even in focus! 🙂 So that brings me to the fact that your center piece, the rock that “is” in focus, is not nearly that big. Does that make sense? And two, when blurring water and items such as that, I would have (personally) increased the temp. to give a warmer color. And you should always use bilateral blurring when doing photo’s with editing like that. (p.s use the mask feature if you have it on your editing program.) With the slight exception that in some instances you can use box blur.

    Photo #2. (Personally my favorite out of the two photos!)

    Literally only one idea, not even edit, try lowering the sharpness setting on your rock, (again using the mask feature) it almost seems to stand out too well. other than that.

    WOW! Color me impressed. Great job! Super-duper impressed. Good stuff!

    #34876

    Josiah Waldner
    Participant

    So I re-edited the first picture, and don’t understand why “you should always use bilateral blurring when doing photo’s with editing like that”
    I prefer to use a fast lens, and let it take care of my background.

    Attachments:
    #34889

    Ben Glick
    Participant

    Hey Josiah, much better on the first photo! To explain, bilateral blurring reduces smearing in photo’s as it brings an item/s out of focus without smearing it into the surroundings. In your photos, (and this is super nit-picky) you have a smear where you used the shutter speed to fast and it brought the background out of context, but it also smeared it. Go to editing, and try and to remove the lens blur and add bilateral. I think it may work better.

    #34965

    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    What a fun idea, @ryanben2! If you’d like me to critique your photo, let me know on the webinar on December 11! https://www.lenspiration.com/photo-critique-with-lenspiration-dec-11/

    I like blur from a fast lens too, @josiahw, over anything done in post-processing.

    #34979

    Ben Glick
    Participant

    Hey! Thanks so much @jamesstaddon! I appreciate it so much! I would love for you to critique this on your webinar, that would mean a lot!

    Hey again @josiahw I did a bad job of saying this, I usually do bilateral blurring, I find this works best for me, but I wanted to apologize I wasn’t cool on how I said that, bro your pictures look good dude, do what works best for you! I have no clue if anyone uses bilateral blurring anymore, so idk, but I’m sorry I wasn’t cool on my response, my bad man.

    #34997

    Josiah Waldner
    Participant

    That’s fine, each to his own I guess. I like fast lenses and I like to leverage them for all they are worth!

    #35011

    Ben Glick
    Participant

    Hey man, can I ask, since it is already obvious that I have to do most of my effects post-process, do you have any advice on how to create better lens blur while taking the photo? I would actually really love to figure that out if you had any advice! @josiahw

    #35022

    Josiah Waldner
    Participant

    The correct term for background blur is “Bokeh”. The best way to gain it is with a very wide aperture- at least f/2, preferably 1.8 or more. There is a big difference between even a 1.8 and a 1.4. Even with a fast lens, there are ways to improve the bokeh of a existing lens. The first is to zoom to the max length you have. I have a f/5.6 lens that has very good bokeh- it is a 600mm. Next, move as close to your subject as possible. Finally, keep as much space between your subject and the background as possible. For example, if trying to take portraits with a 18-55 kit lens, zoom to 55mm, step as close as possible, and keep as much distance between the person and the background. It is no replacement for a fast portrait lens, but it will do in a pinch. In the pictures I took here, I used a 10 stop ND filter to slow my shutter speed to about 15 seconds, ensuring that any movement (water) would be smoothly blurred. Happy Shooting!

    #35204

    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    Hey @ryanben2, as a Lenspiration member, you might find the following article helpful!

    3 Steps to Photographing Beautiful Background Blur

    #35244

    Ben Glick
    Participant

    What a difference! I went outside to take some photo’s with your advice and techniques! The difference is astonishing!

    I can’t believe I didn’t think of any of this earlier!

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 5 days ago by  James Staddon.
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