Shooting in New Zealand

Home Forums Photography Q&A Shooting in New Zealand

This topic contains 12 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Mr. Quebec 2 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #20555

    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    Next week I will be visiting the country of New Zealand for the first time. Based on research, I found out that NZ’s South Island is known for its breathtaking scenery. What important photography tips should I be keeping in mind when shooting fjords, scenic mountains/landscapes, and perhaps, glaciers in NZ? I guess applying the Rule of Thirds would be one of those basic tips.

    #20577

    Mr. Quebec
    Participant

    Definitely use the rule of thirds!
    About landscapes, I would propose to leave enough space in the frame for a foreground, by which I mean something interesting enough to include in your picture on the front, but not too much distracting from what you want to photograph. It will give a perception of depth to the picture.
    And remember that landscapes usually look better in the golden hour. Try to keep the best spots for that part of the day!
    Happy shooting!

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by  Mr. Quebec.
    #20589

    Dan Cope
    Participant

    What a great opportunity! Keep your compositions simple and free of “clutter”. Remember that everything in the frame matters. Being in the Southern Hemisphere there should hopefully be some flowers blooming this time of year which can make for nice foreground interest and color with mountain scenes in the background.

    #20594

    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    What an awesome opportunity! When you are shooting solely for beauty:

    1. Work a scene till you feel you’ve made the best of it; a couple really great shots are better than lots of so-so shots
    2. Incorporate foreground, middleground AND background; include each and think about how the eye moves through a scene
    3. Be there on the edge of light; golden hours, sunset, sunrise, blue hours!
    4. Make sure your pictures are perfectly sharp; proper DOF, tripod if slower shutter speeds

    If it’s a family vacation:

    5. Be artistic and creative when taking the normal memory-making vacation photos
    6. Include siblings/people in your photos; the human element is powerful, and can make uninteresting situations much more interesting
    7. Be involved in planning, suggest locations to be at during the colorful times of day
    8. Post lots of pictures during the vacation (if you have a blog or use social media) to tell the little stories that happen along the way!

    Can’t wait to see some of your work!

    #20736

    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    Thank you very much for all of your suggestions. I tried my best to use those tips as I took pictures in New Zealand. The scenery in Aotearoa was definitely impressive: the rolling hills of farmland or valleys of turquoise waters against the backdrop of majestic mountains. Because I often took pictures while I was in a moving vehicle (whether it was in a car, train, or a boat), the photos don’t tend to be perfectly sharp. Furthermore, the majority of the photos I took were during broad daylight. I did manage to grab the opportunity to shoot pictures during sunset. Below I’ve enclosed a picture I took from a steep trail that leads to Larnach Castle on the Otago Peninsula. This path overlooks farmland in the foreground, an inlet in the middle ground, and mountains in the background.

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    #20773

    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    There’s nothing like putting concepts into practice!

    And what an absolutely glorious photo! It makes me want to be there. This is an exemplary specimen of authentic landscape photography.

    A few suggestions:

    * Remove the bright lens flare spot on the right side of the image
    * Brighten up the image a bit without brightening up the sun area
    * Compositionally, I think I would have included a little more sky and a little less hillside in the foreground

    Remarkable location. Phenomenal sunset. Delightful composition.

    #20807

    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    Thank you very much, @jamesstaddon, for your nice comments and suggestions. That picture is probably the best I’ve ever taken of a landscape during the golden hour. The reason why I included more foreground and less sky was because I wanted to achieve a precise two-thirds ratio. Also, including more foreground was recommended by @mr-quebec.

    I’m not very familiar with editing pictures other than blurring surrounding distractions in pictures in order to bring out the subject. Perhaps I could use the retouch function in Windows’s Photos App to remove the lens flare in the picture. Do you know how I could brighten up the picture with GIMP?

    #20817

    Mr. Quebec
    Participant

    Perhaps I could use the retouch function in Windows’s Photos App to remove the lens flare in the picture

    Personally I would rather use the clone tool in GIMP. (Press “c” for the clone tool. Then hover your cursor beside your lens flare, and press Ctrl and your left mouse button to get the portion of the picture you want to clone over your lens flare.
    To brighten up a picture with GIMP, go under “Colors” in the top menus, and hit “Brightness-Contrast”.

    BTW, awesome picture you got there!

    #20818

    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    Merci beaucoup, @mr-quebec, pour les instructions concernant le corrigeant de la photo utilisant GIMP. Je souhaite qu’elle soit meilleure maintenant.
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    Thank you very much, @mr-quebec, for the instructions regarding editing the photo using GIMP. I hope that it is better now.

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    #20845

    Mr. Quebec
    Participant

    Oui, je la préfère à la première! Petit truc: dans l’onglet des options de l’outil ”clone” on peut changer de brosse et réduire l’opacité pour essayer que la modification paraisse le moins possible (spécialement sur les bords).
    —————————————————————————————————————————-
    Yes, I do prefer it to the first one! Little tip: In the ”clone” tool options window, you can change brushes and reduce the opacity to try to make the patch not too apparent (especially on the edges).

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by  Mr. Quebec.
    #20854

    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    Yes, much better! That’s fun that you can carry on the conversation in French with each other. 🙂 Thanks for translating it so I can understand too. 🙂

    #20869

    Joshua Ong
    Participant

    Merci pour le petit truc dont la photo en bas est une modèle. Je souhaite que la modification ne paraisse pas très évidente. Merci aussi pour répondant en français. J’ai pris les trois années de français comme une élective dans le lycée et je cherche pour quelqu’un avec qui je peux correspondre en français.
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    Thank you for the little trick of which the photo below is an example. I hope that the patch is not very obvious. Thank you also for responding in French. I took three years of French as an elective in high school and I am looking for someone with whom I can correspond in French.

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    #21089

    Mr. Quebec
    Participant

    C’est encore mieux! Excellent travail!

    Merci aussi pour répondant en français.

    Bienvenue!
    ——————————————————————-
    It’s even better! Excellent job!

    Thank you also for responding in French

    You’re welcome!

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