Great Gray Owl

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Josiah Waldner 3 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #29834

    Austin Vinar
    Participant

    Does anyone have thoughts on these pictures?

    Attachments:
    #29837

    Ryan Madaris
    Participant

    Wonderful job! I would like to see the second image in black and white. The main thing I would do is adjust the composition in the second photo. Maybe have the owl in the middle of the image? When it’s at the top, you kind of have to look around for the owl’s head, which should be the main subject.

    I really love the bright yellow eyes!

    #29887

    Caitlin Compton
    Participant

    Wow! I really love these pictures, @austinvinar They look so crisp & clean and look at those yellow eyes. What an amazing Creator we serve! 🙂

    There’s only one thing that I could think of. You’re so close to using the rule of thirds in the first image. The head is almost spot on on the 2 intersecting lines in the top right corner of the grid. I thought that if you cropped it just a bit to get it exactly in the right spot it would look more balanced. Also, with the second image the owl is almost in the middle, but again it’s just a tad off. If you could just centre it, then I think they’d be perfect! Amazing shots! 🙂

    #29889

    Austin Vinar
    Participant

    I don’t always use the rule of thirds. I see it more as a suggestion than a rule. But thanks for the thoughts, It helps me think through my compositions.

    #29895

    Daniel Hancock
    Participant

    Nice job Austin! I have not done much bird photography but know it can be a real challenge getting a clear view without any sticks in the way!

    #30034

    James Staddon
    Keymaster

    I really like these shots @austinvinar

    #31957

    Silas Wood
    Participant

    WOW!! @austinvinar those pictures are sharp
    what lens did you use?

    #32017

    Austin Vinar
    Participant

    Sigma 150-600mm C.

    #32028

    Josiah Waldner
    Participant

    I don’t have a very good sense for composition, but you did a great job with the technical side of things! Very sharp, well exposed, and it looks like you somehow got a really nice catchlight in the eyes. If I am correct, it looks like it was was backlight. Did you use a flash for that? I have the Tamron 150-600, and I am not really impressed with its sharpness. I picked it over the sigma because I had heard that sigma has a plastic camera mount. Is that true? It seems to get slightly better sharpness at shutter speeds of 1/500 or more and f/10, but you have to run your iso uncomfortably high. Any advice?

    #32033

    Austin Vinar
    Participant

    Very sharp wide open. Metal mount. Sharp at 1/100 handheld and 1/30 on tripod. Often slower.

    #32035

    Josiah Waldner
    Participant

    Wow. Here is a crop of a blackbird I took today.
    iso 500
    f/10
    1/160 shutter speed
    =
    Nowhere near as sharp! Could the lens need micro adjustment, or what?
    I have a 70d, not the greatest, but it can do much better with my 85mm f/1.8.
    The focus speed of this lens is quite slow too- maybe I should look at a sigma.

    Attachments:
    #32037

    Austin Vinar
    Participant

    Hmmm. Not sure why it isn’t real sharp. You have your stabilization on right?

    Try microadjusting, it won’t hurt anything.

    I’m using the 7D, so it shouldn’t be the camera’s problem.

    I have had this lenses af keep up with grouse flying straight at me. In cold temps.

    #32038

    Ryan Madaris
    Participant

    @josiahw, Interesting! I would suggest using a lower ISO. There’s a lot of noise in the image. Also, use a faster shutter speed. 1/160 is a bit slow for handholding the camera when shooting wildlife unless you have image stabilization. That may solve the problem with that photo. I don’t have very much experience with Canon, though, as I’ve always been a Nikon user.

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by  Ryan Madaris.
    #32041

    Austin Vinar
    Participant

    I guess it depends on what your definition of a lot of noise is. I shoot iso 800 most of the time with the older 7D and have not had any problems. But then I have seen someone take a picture that I thought was very acceptable and call it too noisy.

    Honestly, I took a shot with my 7D at ISO 3200 pushed it a full stop in Lightroom, and sold it as the beginning shot for an article. I likely worked a bit with noise reduction but I would call ISO 500 a low ISO.

    #32048

    Josiah Waldner
    Participant

    Thanks for the input! Yes, I do have image stabilization on.
    There is no way this lens will lock onto a flying bird, unless it is in a clear sky. If there is any background, forget it.
    The picture does seem a little noisy, but it is a 6x crop. I usually go much higher with my iso.

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